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Front Page News at Indiana University

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New science department at IU Bloomington links biology, chemistry, and medical sciences
IU cognitive scientists receive $3.1 million for innovative training methods
New competencies to help teachers of students with autism spectrum disorders
Cancer patients who are separated when diagnosed have worse survival rates
Career retrospective of IU photojournalist's work at National Geographic to open Friday
New book provides insight into growing homeschooling movement
Ben Folds to play IU Auditorium Sept. 27
T. Boone Pickens visiting IU Sept. 18 to discuss 'America's Foreign Oil Dependency Crisis'
Fair trade store with branches in Indy opening in Bloomington's downtown square
IU Bloomington Scoreboard

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New science department at IU Bloomington links biology, chemistry, and medical sciences -- The new Department of Molecular and Cellular Biochemistry is the first science department created on the Indiana University Bloomington campus in 33 years, and is the culmination of more than seven years of planning. The IU Trustees recently approved the department. "We don't only span the void between biology and chemistry, but from those fields to the medical sciences, too," said microbial biochemist Carl Bauer, who will be the department's first chair. "Most of our faculty study medically relevant viruses, like hepatitis B and C." The department is offering M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in biochemistry, but does not award undergraduate degrees. Read the complete story.

IU cognitive scientists receive $3.1 million for innovative training methods -- Cognitive scientists at Indiana University Bloomington received a five-year, $3.1 million grant from the National Science Foundation to create and employ innovative methods for training future scientists. According to the NSF, the Integrative Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) program is intended to "catalyze a cultural change in graduate education" with innovative new models for graduate education and training that transcend traditional disciplinary boundaries. IGERT also is "intended to facilitate diversity in student participation and preparation, and to contribute to a world-class, broadly inclusive, and globally engaged science and engineering workforce." Read the complete story.

New competencies to help teachers of students with autism spectrum disorders -- The Council for Exceptional Children (CEC), in conjunction with the Autism Society of America (ASA), has announced the publication of professional competencies for teaching students with autism spectrum disorders. These competencies, the result of a three-year grant funded by the Autism Society of America, will be incorporated into the CEC's resource on highly qualified teachers titled What Every Special Educator Needs to Know and endorsed by the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). "As the incidence of autism has increased, universities and colleges created their own version of competencies to guide program development," said Cathy Pratt, director of the Indiana Resource Center for Autism at Indiana University and chair of the Autism Society Board, who worked on the competencies. Read the complete story.

Cancer patients who are separated when diagnosed have worse survival rates than patients who are widowed, divorced, or have never married -- Among unmarried cancer patients, those who are separated at the time of diagnosis do not live as long as widowed, divorced, and never married patients. That is the conclusion of a new study to be published in the Nov. 1, 2009 issue of CANCER, a peer-reviewed journal of the American Cancer Society. The authors of the study say its results suggest that the stress associated with marital separation may compromise an individual's immune system and lead to a greater susceptibility to cancer. Research has shown that personal relationships have a significant role in physical health -- specifically that good relationships are beneficial and poor relationships are deleterious. Also, many studies of cancer prognosis have found that patients who are married live longer than those who are single. However, little information is available regarding differences in survival among the various types of people who are unmarried. Read the complete story.

Career retrospective of IU photojournalist's work at National Geographic to open Friday -- A collection of photographs spanning a career of nearly 40 years by Indiana University professor and National Geographic photographer Steve Raymer will make its debut Friday, Sept. 4, at pictura gallery in downtown Bloomington. An artist reception and opening are scheduled that evening from 5-8 p.m. at the gallery, located at 122 W. Sixth St. Raymer joined National Geographic magazine as a staff photographer in 1972 and produced some of the most iconic images of the 1970s, 1980s and 1990s, from famines in Bangladesh and Ethiopia to the collapse of the former Soviet Union. Now an associate professor at the IU School of Journalism, Raymer continues to photograph for National Geographic and other international magazines. Read the complete story.

New book provides insight into growing homeschooling movement -- In a new book that Publishers Weekly says "puts a human face on Christian homeschooling," a professor at the Indiana University School of Education chronicles the stories of six conservative Christian families from across the country and analyzes the growing homeschooling movement. Write these Laws on Your Children: Inside the World of Conservative Christian Homeschooling (Beacon Press) is written by Robert Kunzman, associate professor for curriculum and instruction. Over two years Kunzman followed families in Los Angeles, Vermont, rural Tennessee, Oregon, and northwestern Indiana as they homeschooled their children. Read the complete story.

Ben Folds to play IU Auditorium Sept. 27 -- Ben Folds will perform at Indiana University Auditorium Sunday, Sept. 27, at 8 p.m. The show is presented by IU Auditorium and NiteLite Promotions. Tickets are $27 for Indiana University students and $37 for the general public and go on sale Friday, Aug. 28, at 10 a.m. Tickets are available at the IU Auditorium box office, IUauditorium.com, Ticketmaster.com, all Ticketmaster outlets, or charge by phone at 800-745-3000. IU Auditorium is located at 1211 E. Seventh St. Australian singer-songwriter Kate Miller-Heidke will open the show. Read the complete story.

T. Boone Pickens visiting IU Sept. 18 to discuss 'America's Foreign Oil Dependency Crisis' -- T. Boone Pickens, one of America's most successful businessmen and the founder of an ambitious, self-funded grassroots campaign aimed at reducing the nation's dependence on imported oil, will speak at Indiana University Bloomington Sept. 18. Pickens will be a guest of IU's Kelley School of Business and will speak to university students, faculty and guests at IU Auditorium, 1211 E. Seventh St. He also will meet with reporters beforehand. IU President Michael A. McRobbie will introduce Pickens. The title of his speech will be "America's Foreign Oil Dependency Crisis." Read the complete story.

Fair trade store with branches in Indy opening in Bloomington's downtown square -- Indiana University Bloomington lecturer Mary Embry will help oversee the opening of a new, not-for-profit fair trade store, Global Gifts, in collaboration with the Indianapolis-based Global Gifts stores and Fair Trade Bloomington. The store is expected to open Aug. 25 at 122 N. Walnut St. with grand opening celebrations scheduled for Sept. 11-12 from10 a.m. to 8 p.m. The grand opening will include in-store activities, free fair trade coffee and chocolate samples, live music and a ten percent discount on all merchandise. Read the complete story.

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Indiana University Bloomington Scoreboard

Results from Friday, Aug. 21:
Women's Soccer: The Indiana women's soccer team got the 2009 season started off on the right track with a 2-0 win over Wright State at Armstrong Stadium on Friday night. Read the match notes.

Results from Saturday, Aug. 22:
Field Hockey: The Indiana field hockey team used goals from redshirt freshman Morgan Fleetwood and sophomore Corey Brautigam for a 4-1 win at Louisville on Saturday, Aug. 22, in the Hoosiers final preseason scrimmage. Read the match notes.

Schedule for Thursday, Aug. 27:
Men's Soccer: Drake University, 7 p.m., Ft. Wayne, Ind.

Schedule for Friday, Aug. 28:
Field Hockey: American, 11 a.m., Richmond, Va.
Women's Volleyball: Southeastern Louisiana, 6:30 p.m., Houston, Texas
Women's Soccer: Evansville, 7:30 p.m., Bloomington, Ind.

Schedule for Saturday, Aug. 29:
Women's Volleyball: New Orleans, 12:30 p.m.; Houston, 8:30 p.m., Houston, Texas
Men's Soccer: DePaul, 8 p.m., Ft. Wayne, Ind.

Schedule for Sunday, Aug. 30:
Field Hockey: Richmond, 2 p.m., Richmond, Va.
Women's Soccer: Central Michigan, 2 p.m., Bloomington, Ind.

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IU in the news

'The World Is Open'
Inside Higher Ed, Aug. 25 -- Technology is changing higher education in more ways than can be counted. Distance education has become common. Leading universities are putting course materials or even entire courses online -- free. The Obama plan for community colleges envisions free online courses that could be used nationwide. Curtis J. Bonk, a professor of instructional systems technology at Indiana University, surveys this landscape in The World Is Open: How Web Technology is Revolutionizing Education (Jossey-Bass). Full story.

As Harley searches, some businesses see Pa. as a keeper
York Daily Record, Aug. 25 -- Jerry Robbins said that when it comes down to it, relocation is more than government money. Local and state officials have met with and been welcoming of his company, Aztec Solar Power, but he also said redevelopment officials in other areas of Pennsylvania seemed quite persistent initially with financial aid options. But in the end, his company keeps going forward with its plan to bring its operations to York County, and add about 50 to 100 jobs to the local community. At least one state eyed by Harley has a state government on fairly strong financial ground compared to other parts of the country, said Kyle Anderson, an assistant professor at the Kelley School of Business at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. Indiana has a popular governor who could financially, and politically, roll out a hefty red carpet for a company it wanted, Anderson said. Full story.

Summer gains
The Observer, Aug. 25 -- Kids heading back to school will be weighed down by more than a knapsack -- they'll likely be carrying more fat too. According to Dr. Mike Bishop, kids pack on the pounds during the summer -- research at Indiana University and Ohio State University showed that kids gained twice as much weight in the summer months than during the school year. So just what's eating them? "In the summer kids lack the structure and activities of the school year, and have abundant time to engage in the unhealthy behaviours that lead to weight gain -- eating snacks, watching TV, playing video games, and texting their friends," says Bishop, a clinical psychologist and executive director of Wellspring, which specializes in weight loss programs for overweight teens. Full story.

A Few Dollars at a Time, Patrons Support Artists on the Web
New York Times, Aug. 24 -- Patrick Rooney, director of research at the Center on Philanthropy at Indiana University, said that some online donors, particularly younger ones with less money to contribute, could find Kickstarter's model more appealing than donating to traditional nonprofit institutions. "It's very personal in some ways, as opposed to giving a gift to, say, Indiana University," he said. Indeed, Emily Grenader, a 24-year-old artist in Houston, directly involved her patrons in her project: mailing postcards every day for an entire year. "I needed the funding but I also needed addresses -- people -- to make it work," she said. Full story.

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