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Front Page News at Indiana University

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"Wacky, Wild, Crimson Style" at IU Bloomington Homecoming, Oct. 9 to 17
IU Opera Theater continues season with timeless 'Roméo et Juliette'
IU president recognizes distinguished cancer center physician
Google's book settlement: A view from both sides
Diabetes-related research at IU School of Optometry advances with two NIH awards
IBRC's Leading Index for Indiana will enable Hoosiers to better understand state market conditions
Discover of genetic defect may lead to better treatments for common gut diseases
IU College Arts and Humanities Institute to present public reading by leading British novelist
IU's Indiana Memorial Union Board celebrates its centennial
Indiana Optometric Association members convene at IU Bloomington
Violin legend Josef Gingold remembered in 100th birthday celebration
"Urban Education Excellence" project for School of Education at IUPUI earns federal grant
IU professor's new book, 'The Year's Work in Lebowski Studies' dissects cult classic film
IU Bloomington Scoreboard

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"Wacky, Wild, Crimson Style" at IU Bloomington Homecoming, Oct. 9 to 17 -- "Wacky, Wild, Crimson Style" is the theme of Indiana University's 2009 Homecoming in Bloomington. IU alumni, students, and friends are invited to nearly 20 activities taking place Oct. 9 to 17, including the 51st IU Homecoming parade; concerts ranging from jazz to country to the official Homecoming show, "Rain: A Tribute to the Beatles"; Hoosier Hysteria introducing the men's and women's basketball teams to fans; and finally a gridiron battle between the Hoosiers and the Fighting Illini. Read the complete story.

IU Opera Theater continues season with timeless 'Roméo et Juliette' -- Indiana University Opera Theater continues its 2009-10 season with the passionate, timeless Roméo et Juliette, opening Oct. 23 at the Musical Arts Center. The company has produced this lush work only twice before, in 1966 and in 2005. Acclaimed stage director Michael Ehrman -- who directed IU Opera's all new 2005 production of the work -- returns for an encore. Ehrman's staging of this classic tale promises plenty of action and drama, as he integrates both fight and dance choreography in scenes ranging from large crowds to the couple's tender moments, even managing to throw in a bit of humor. Read the complete story.

IU president recognizes distinguished cancer center physician -- On Oct. 8, Indiana University formally recognized the physician who is credited with curing testicular cancer. IU President Michael McRobbie presented Distinguished Professor Lawrence Einhorn, M.D., the Lance Armstrong Foundation Professor in Oncology and a physician/researcher with the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Cancer Center, with a Thomas Hart Benton Mural Medallion in recognition of his prominent achievement and dedicated service. Read the complete story.

Google's book settlement: A view from both sides -- Is Google the world's biggest pirate of copyrighted works, or is it performing a valuable public service by making out-of-print books easily accessible to millions of people? In 2004, Google embarked on a herculean project: scanning and digitizing entire libraries of books. While the Google Book Search project grew to an estimated seven million volumes by 2008, class-action lawsuits filed on behalf of publishers and authors in the United States, France and Germany challenged the Internet search giant's legal right to do so. The Google Book Search case will be at the center of a debate on Monday (Oct. 12) at the Indiana University Maurer School of Law. Participants will include Steven Hetcher, co-director of the Technology & Entertainment Program at the Vanderbilt University Law School, and Anthony Rose, JD'90, a partner with Meitus Gelbert Rose LLP in Indianapolis. Read the complete story.

Diabetes-related research at IU School of Optometry advances with two NIH awards -- An Indiana University School of Optometry researcher and the IU spinout company she formed to develop a new diagnostic camera have both received grants from federal agencies to advance work toward preventing vision loss in diabetes patients. Ann Elsner, director of IU's Borish Center for Ophthalmic Research, has been awarded $379,548 from the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB), while Elsner's IU spinout company, Aeon Imaging, has received another $247,389 from the Small Business Innovation Research program of the National Eye Institute (NEI). Both the NIBIB and the NEI are agencies within the National Institutes of Health. Read the complete story.

IBRC's Leading Index for Indiana will enable Hoosiers to better understand state market conditions -- The Indiana Business Research Center at Indiana University's Kelley School of Business today (Oct. 7) announced the creation of a new economic index that will enable Hoosiers to better understand market conditions in the state. The IBRC's new Leading Index for Indiana (LII) reflects the unique structure of the Indiana economy, in contrast to The Conference Board's Leading Economic Index and other indexes that are national in scope. It was announced this week in the center's publication, The Indiana Business Review. Read the complete story.

Discover of genetic defect may lead to better treatments for common gut diseases -- New findings related to an uncommon genetic disorder may impact the diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), the most common chronic gastrointestinal illness in children and teens. Two million Americans have IBD which involves inflammation of the gastrointestinal tract. The research was led by a team of physicians which included Mary Dinauer of the Herman B Wells Center for Pediatric Research at the Indiana University School of Medicine and Riley Hospital for Children. Read the complete story.

IU College Arts and Humanities Institute to present public reading by leading British novelist -- Indiana University's College Arts and Humanities Institute will present a free, open to the public reading by Booker Prize-winning author A.S. Byatt next Monday (Oct. 12) at 5 p.m. in the Indiana Memorial Union's Solarium. Already a formidable literary figure in England, Byatt achieved best-seller status in the United States in 1990 with her Booker Prize-winning novel Possession: A Romance, a story about a clandestine love affair between two Victorian writers and the two modern-day academics who unearth their secret. The novel was made into a film in 2002. Her novella Morpho Eugenia (1992), in which she examines the similarities between anthills and 19th-century manor households, was made into the acclaimed 1995 film Angels and Insects. Read the complete story.

IU's Indiana Memorial Union Board celebrates its centennial -- The Indiana Memorial Union Board, the programming and governing body of one of Indiana University's most recognizable and enduring landmarks, officially turns 100 in December. Today a 500,000-square-foot, bustling gathering place for faculty, staff, students and visitors, the IMU contains a three-star hotel, several restaurants, a multilevel bookstore, a bowling alley, a movie theater, a beauty salon, an electronics store and hundreds of gathering spaces for high-profile lecturers, meetings, conferences and performances. The building also houses IU's student government offices within the Student Activities Tower, where up to 50 campus organizations conduct regular meetings. Read the complete story.

Indiana Optometric Association members convene at IU Bloomington -- Hundreds of Indiana's top optometrists are converging on the Indiana University Bloomington campus today as the Indiana Optometric Association's (IOA) annual fall seminar gets under way. Optometrists from across the country, including seminar presenters from Oregon, New Jersey, New York, Kentucky and Oklahoma, will spend two days in Bloomington focusing on the latest issues in eye care and ocular disease management, according to Sarita Soni, interim dean of the IU School of Optometry. Read the complete story.

Violin legend Josef Gingold remembered in 100th birthday celebration -- A celebration befitting the centennial birthday of one of the greatest violinists and violin pedagogues of all time, Josef Gingold, will be presented Nov. 1 at 8 p.m. at Indiana University Auditorium. Two of his most prominent students, now with international reputations of their own and both on faculty at the IU Jacobs School of Music, will be featured artists at the concert -- Joshua Bell and Jaime Laredo, who will also serve as music director. Bell and Laredo will be joined by the IU Violin Virtuosi, the Celebration Orchestra and special guests. Read the complete story.

"Urban Education Excellence" project for School of Education at IUPUI earns federal grant -- The Indiana University School of Education at IUPUI has received from the U.S. Department of Education a five-year, $2.7 million Teacher Quality Partnership grant for a new teacher residency program. The grant expands the Woodrow Wilson Teaching Fellowship program and will lead to a master's degree in education with graduates licensed to teach both general and special education. It is one of only 28 grants the federal government is awarding to improve instruction in struggling schools. Read the complete story.

IU professor's new book, 'The Year's Work in Lebowski Studies' dissects cult classic film -- Somewhere in the world, right at this moment, someone is watching the cult-classic 1998 Coen brothers film The Big Lebowski and sipping a white Russian. Just ask Ed Comentale, an associate professor of English at Indiana University Bloomington, who co-wrote and edited an upcoming book of essays analyzing the movie, The Year's Work in Lebowski Studies (Nov. 1, IU Press). Prior to its release, the book has already been previewed in The New Yorker, the Los Angeles Times and The Boston Globe. Read the complete story.

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Indiana University Bloomington Scoreboard

Results from Tuesday, Oct. 6:
Women's Golf: The Indiana women's golf team closed out play with a 315 on Monday to finish seventh at the Johnie Imes Invitational at The Club at Old Hawthorne in Columbia, Mo. Read the tournament notes.

Results from Wednesday, Oct. 7:
Men's Tennis: Sophomores Jeremy Langer and Maxime Armengaud won in the final round of qualifying to advance to the main draw of the D'Novo/ITA All-American Invitational in doubles action. Read the qualifier notes.
Men's Soccer: The Indiana men's soccer team took a 1-0 lead over Butler with less than four minutes gone off the clock but could not hang on, giving up a goal in the final minutes of regulation to sent the game to double OT where the Bulldogs came up with a 2-1 victory. Read the match notes.

Results from Thursday, Oct. 8:
Men's Tennis: Sophomores Jeremy Langer and Maxime Armengaud fell in the first round of the main draw of the D'Novo/ITA All-American Invitational in doubles action. Read the tournament notes.

Schedule for Friday, Oct. 9:
Field Hockey: Michigan State, 3 p.m., Bloomington, Ind.
Women's Tennis: North Florida Invitational, Jacksonville, Fla.

Schedule for Saturday, Oct. 10:
Field Hockey: Central Michigan, 1 p.m., Bloomington, Ind.
Football: Virgina, 3:30 p.m., Charlottesville, Va.
Men's Soccer: Michigan, 3:30 p.m., Ann Arbor, Mich.
Women's Volleyball: Illinois, 8 p.m., Champaign, Ill.
Women's Tennis: North Florida Invitational, Jacksonville, Fla.

Schedule for Sunday, Oct. 11:
Women's Volleyball: Northwestern, 6 p.m., Evanston, Ill.
Women's Tennis: North Florida Invitational, Jacksonville, Fla.

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IU in the news

Innovation: The psychology of Google Wave
NewScientist, Oct. 9 -- Over the past week Google has been rolling out the first invitations to its latest service, a complex "real-time communication and collaboration" system dubbed Google Wave. Instead of sending messages back and forth, users create web-page-like documents called waves that others can modify or comment on, using a combination of features more usually seen separately in email, wikis, instant messaging and social networking. Two of the features of Wave that are likely to alter how people communicate are related to time: it allows users to see others typing live, even if they later delete that text; and a "replay" function plays back the complex tangle of interactions that produced a wave. Past research has shown that the real-time, synchronous, nature of instant messaging (IM) encourages an informal tone, says Susan Herring, who researches the convergence of computer communication platforms at Indiana University in Bloomington. "It invokes face-to-face communication and encourages people to use conversational strategies," she explains. Full story.

IU dedicates new research lab in downtown Indianapolis
WTHR, Oct. 8 -- Indiana University prepares to open its largest laboratory at the IU Medical Center Thursday. It's the new home to scientists in a broad range of disciplines. The $83.3 million Joseph Walther Hall with its 118 new labs is next to Riley Hospital, and connects two other research buildings, essentially creating a 500,000-square-foot facility spanning a city block. Once of the biggest challenges in medical research is getting the discoveries made in the lab out into the world of clinical medicine at hospitals, essentially in the form of real treatments for patients. This new research facility helps make that transition easier by placing scientists, Ph.Ds, and doctors together, right next door to a number of hospitals, for an easier exchange of ideas and delivery of patient care. Full story.

'Whatever,' Like, Totally Tops List of Most Annoying Words
FOX News, Oct. 8 -- So, you know, it is what it is, but Americans are totally annoyed by the use of "whatever" in conversations. The popular slacker term of indifference was found "most annoying in conversation" by 47 percent of Americans surveyed in a Marist College poll released Wednesday. "Whatever" easily beat out "you know," which especially grated a quarter of respondents. The other annoying contenders were "anyway" (at 7 percent), "it is what it is" (11 percent) and "at the end of the day" (2 percent). "It doesn't surprise me because 'whatever' is in a special class, probably," said Michael Adams, author of "Slang: The People's Poetry" and an associate professor of English at Indiana University. "It's a word that -- and it depends how a speaker uses it -- can suggest dismissiveness." Full story.

Musical therapy lifts spirits, eases pain and anxiety
Indianapolis Star, Oct. 8 -- A growing body of research shows that music helps to decrease pain and blood pressure; improve language skills in stroke victims and others; ease anxiety before surgeries and in stressful times; enhance memory; increase melatonin to improve sleep; provide an outlet to express feelings, including grief; improve movement in Parkinson's patients; and help youth with autism or hearing loss. "It buffers some of the chaos and brings normalization to something that is not normal," said Debra Burns, coordinator of the music-therapy program at Indiana University-Purdue University Indianapolis. "We teach people how to pair music with imagery experiences to decrease anxiety and help them get a sense of control." Full story.

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