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Lecture Notes

March 26 - April 8, 2007

"Nation and Diaspora: Cultural and Theoretical Crossings in Black Women's Writings"
March 26, 7 p.m., La Casa, 715 E. 7th St., Bloomington -- Discuss an analysis by Paula Sanmartin, visiting assistant professor, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, of how several Black Cuban women poets explore the formation of black women's identity within the framework of a poetics of resistance and self-recognition. For more information, visit http://www.indiana.edu/~lacasa/.

Fritz Stern

Fritz Stern

"The Second Thirty Years' War: Europe 1914-1945"
March 26, 7:30 p.m., Rawles Hall 100, Bloomington -- Fritz Stern, professor emeritus at Columbia University, established himself in the post-war era as one of the most influential chroniclers of modern German history alive today on either side of the Atlantic. Stern will present two lectures of the IUB campus. For more information, visit http://www.indiana.edu/~deanfac/patten/stern_patten.htm.

"Moments in Time"
March 26, 8 p.m., Fine Arts 015, Bloomington -- In the age of Internet, e-mail and streaming video, the role of the news media is ever changing -- and Dirck Halstead is at the center of understanding the new demands facing journalism. Halstead is the editor and publisher of The Digital Journalist, an online magazine that explores the issues facing the modern photojournalist. Halstead also has 30 years of experience as a globetrotting, award-winning photojournalist, capturing some of the most famous moments of White House life and contributing a record 51 cover photographs to Time magazine. For more information, visit http://journalism.indiana.edu.

"The Meaning of Borders: Nationalism and Internationalism in Nineteenth Century Musical Germany"
March 27, 5 p.m., Ford-Crawford Hall, Bloomington -- Celia Applegate will focus on the question of cultural and political borders and show how they both hardened in the course of the nineteenth century, as well as how they reinforced and undermined each other. The particular focus of the talk is the work of music journalists and writers in defining German music's place in a world of nations. Its general goal is to show how an 18th century understanding and experience of cosmopolitanisma world of enlightened humanity above borders gave way to a 19th century experience of internationalism, that is, producing and experiencing art within the framework of the nation-state. For more information, visit http://www.music.indiana.edu/apps/prelude/new/index.php?id=3616.

"America's Educator"
March 27, 7-8:30 p.m., the IMU Alumni Hall, Bloomington -- Ron Clark, 2000 Disney American Teacher of the Year, will speak on opportunities for low-income families and the importance of travel in curriculum. Clark, also known as "America's Educator," is an inspirational speaker and award-winning teacher. For more information, contact ubpr@indiana.edu.

"Current Perspective on Caring for the Cognitively Impaired: 100 Years after Patient Auguste D."
March 28, 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Emerson Hall, 545 Barnhill Dr., Indianapolis -- The Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center at the Indiana University School of Medicine is commemorating the 100th anniversary of Dr. Alois Alzheimer's study that defined Alzheimer's disease. Clarissa Rentz, M.S.N., executive director of the Greater Cincinnati Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association, will present a free lecture, "Caring for a Family and Person with Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementing Disorders: A Biopsychosocial, Spiritual Perspective." For more information and registration, contact 317-274-1590.

Emergence of order in physical, chemical and biological systems
March 28, 4 p.m., Swain West 119, Bloomington -- Do the spiral patterns in a frog egg, a fibrillating heart, vibrating sand and ocean eddies have anything in common? The sizes are vastly different, and the biology of even a simple frog egg is far more complicated than the physics of a fluid or sand grains. Yet the patterns formed in such systems, differing widely in scale and in the underlying molecular mechanisms, can in some cases be understood from a common approach. Harry Swinney of the University of Texas at Austin will dicuss this as part of the Joseph and Sophia Konopinski Colloquia Series. For more information, visit http://www.physics.indiana.edu/~colloquium/index.shtml.

"Turning Inside Out: Claes Oldenburg's Chicago Years"
March 28, 5 p.m., Herron School of Art and Design, Basile Auditorium, 735 W. New York St., Indianapolis -- Lisa Freiman, curator of contemporary art at the Indianapolis Museum of Art, will examine Oldenburg's pre-pop work created in Chicago between 1946 and 1959, charting his journey to open himself up to the irrational world of dreams and the unconscious. For more information, contact jerobert@iupui.edu or jenlee@iupui.edu.

"Fairness/Lightness/Whiteness in Advertising: The Mobility of Feminine Beauty in Globalizing India"
March 28, 7 p.m., Asian Culture Center, 807 E. 10th St., Bloomington -- The recent commercial boom in women's skin lightening or "fairness" cosmetics in India is part of the larger context of escalating "vanity" consumerism in South Asia's current climate of economic and cultural globalization. This project examines the cultural politics of gender and colorism in the symbolic narratives of magazine advertisements for fairness cosmetics and personal care products. For more information, contact acc@indiana.edu.

"The Historian and His Own Time: A Witness of 20th Century History"
March 28, 7:30 p.m., Rawles Hall 100, Bloomington -- Fritz Stern, professor emeritus at Columbia University, established himself in the post-war era as one of the most influential chroniclers of modern German history alive today on either side of the Atlantic. For more information, visit http://www.indiana.edu/~deanfac/patten/stern_patten.htm.

"How the University Graduate School is Working to Increase the Numbers of Latinos in Higher Education"
March 29, 1 p.m., La Casa, 715 E. 7th St., Bloomington -- Sponsored by the Center for Latin America and the Caribbean Studies, La Casa and Latino Studies, Yolanda Trevino, assistant dean of the IU Graduate School will present, "How the University Graduate School is Working to Increase the Numbers of Latinos in Higher Education." For more information, visit http://www.indiana.edu/~lacasa/.

Space-Time Models of Drugs and Violence
March 29, 4:30 p.m., University Library Auditorium, 755 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis -- Rudy Banerjee, assistant professor in the IU School of Liberal Arts, specializes in geo-spatial applications in the realm of preventative health policies. This talk will describe an investigation of the relationship between alcohol outlets and alcohol-related violence in the community. For more information, call 317-278-2664.

Catherine Barnes

Catherine Barnes

"Diversity Pays"
March 29, 6 p.m., IU Kokomo Art Gallery, Kokomo -- Opening the doors of education, the workplace and social and political life to diverse people is not just the right thing to do, says Catherine Barnes. It can produce great rewards. Sponsored by the IU Kokomo Alumni Association, Barnes will outline how "Diversity Pays." For more information, visit http://www.indiana.edu/~koocm/mar07/BarnesLecture.shtml.

"What's Past is Prologue: Nazi Art Looting and Its Legacy"
March 29, 7 p.m., Indianapolis Art Museum, DeBoest Lecture Hall, 4000 Michigan Road, Indianapolis -- Nancy Yeide, department head, Curatorial Records, National Gallery of Art, will present an overview of Nazi looting and postwar restitution efforts, with special emphasis on the 2000-piece collection formed by Reichmarschall Hermann Goering. Yeide will also address recent achievements and challenges in museums' provenance research. For more information, contact jerobert@iupui.edu or jenlee@iupui.edu.

"The Non-Jew as Woman: Engendering the Christian and Muslim Other in Kabbalitic Symbolism"
March 29, 7:30 p.m., the IMU Dogwood Room, Bloomington -- Elliot R. Wolfson, Abraham Lieberman Professor of Hebrew and Judaic Studies at New York University, will present this Jewish Studies lecture. His main area of scholarly research is the history of Jewish mysticism, but he has brought to bear on that field training in philosophy, literary criticism, feminist theory, postmodern hermeneutics and the phenomenology of religion. For more information, contact mdeckard@indiana.edu.

Priam's Gold: The Straightforward Story of a Controversial Treasure
March 29, 7:30 p.m.-8:30 p.m., School of Fine Arts 015, Bloomington -- This lecture unravels the extraordinary story of Heinrich Schliemann's Troy Treasures, including the famous Priam's Treasure. The collection disappeared from the Berlin Museum at the end of World War II and for decades its location was a mystery---until 1993, when the treasure was uncovered in Russia. The lecturer, Donald Easton, is one of few modern scholars to have handled the material. For more information, visit http://www.artmuseum.iu.edu.

Latinos and the Law: Is Our Past Also Our Future?
March 29-30, Moot Court Room (123), 211 S. Indiana Ave., Bloomington -- The conference will address some of the most pressing challenges facing the Latino community. Some of these challenges are well known and widely debated, such as questions over immigration, human rights and civic participation. During this two-day conference, an interdisciplinary group of prominent scholars and practitioners will discuss these and related issues central to the Latino experience. For more information, visit http://www.law.indiana.edu/front/special/20070329_latin.shtml.

The Future of Health Care at IU
March 30, 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m., the IMU Frangipani Room, Bloomington -- The IU Bloomington Professional Council presents a public forum on the "Future of Health Care at IU." Panelists from SPEA, IU Human Researce Services, IU Health Care Commission and the Bloomington Hospital will discuss current trends in university and public-sector health care, the university's plans for new initiatives such as the employee health care clinic, smoking cessation and other preventative care and the possibility of universal health care coverage in Indiana and the United States. For more information, visit http://www.indiana.edu/~iubpc.

The Deepening Divide: Inequality in the Information Society
March 30, 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m., Well Library, room LI001, Bloomington -- Jan A.G.M. van Dijk, professor of communication science at the University of Twente, will consider the present state of the digital divide worldwide. For more information, visit http://rkcsi.indiana.edu/article.php/2007-spring/94.

New Directions in Self-Validation Research
March 30, 3:30 p.m., Psychological and Brian Sciences Building room 101, Bloomington -- Rich Petty, Ohio State University, will review some early self-validation work and focus on recent research examining the role that emotion plays in thought validation. For more information, contact sherman@indiana.edu.

"Start the Healing: Searching for Solutions to Political, Social and Cultural Issues in the African Diaspora"
March 31, 11:30 a.m., Neal-Marshall Center Grand Hall, Bloomington -- William C. Rhoden, journalist at the New York Times, will speak as part of the Horizons of Knowledge lecture series. For more information, contact dof@indiana.edu.

"Current Perspective on Caring for the Cognitively Impaired: 100 Years after Patient Auguste D."
April 3, 1 p.m.-4 p.m., Emerson Hall, 545 Barnhill Dr., Indianapolis -- The Indiana Alzheimer Disease Center at the Indiana University School of Medicine is commemorating the 100th anniversary of Dr. Alois Alzheimer's study that defined Alzheimer's disease. Clarissa Rentz, M.S.N., executive director of the Greater Cincinnati Chapter of the Alzheimer's Association, will present a free lecture, "What We Know About Developmental Disabilities and Dementia: An Overview of Alzheimer's Disease in the Person with Down Syndrome." For more information and registration, contact 317-274-1590.

"Finding my way: fossils, choanoflagellates and motherhood"
April 4, 4 p.m., Myers Hall 130, Bloomington -- 2005 MacArthur Fellow Nicole King, Ph.D., will present the 25th Joan Wood Lecture, entitled "Finding my way: fossils, choanoflagellates and motherhood." For more information on the lecture series, visit http://development.bio.indiana.edu/wood_lecture.htm.

"Why did Newton Believe in Alchemy?"
April 4, 4 p.m., Swain West 119, Bloomington -- History and Philosophy of Science Chair William Newman will question Isaac Newton's belief in alchemy as part of the Joseph and Sophia Konopinski Colloquia Series. For more information, visit http://www.physics.indiana.edu/~colloquium/index.shtml.

"The Three Romes"
April 4, 5:15-6:30 p.m., the IMU State Room East, Bloomington -- Professor Glen Bowersock will present as part of the Horizons of Knowledge Ancient Studies Distinguished Lecturer series. Bowersock is one of the most insightful scholars not only on the classical world but also on Hellenism in the Greco-Roman Near East. His two notable studies -- one about Julian the Apostate and another on Roman Arabia -- are but a small portion of his outstanding interdisciplinary scholarship. For more information, contact jharrill@indiana.edu.

Kenneth Cooper

Kenneth Cooper

"Preventative Medicine and Health Promotion: 21st Century Medicine"
April 4, 7 p.m., the IMU Frangipani Room, Bloomington -- The "father of aerobics," Dr. Kenneth Cooper, will present a public lecture as part of the Grow Move Change HPER Research Symposium. For more information on the lecture and research symposium, visit http://www.hper.indiana.edu/development/cooper.shtml or contact dskent@indiana.edu.

World's Most Dangerous Gang
April 4, 7 p.m., La Casa, 715 E. 7th St., Bloomington -- Did you know Mara Salvatrucha a.k.a. (MS -13) is the fastest growing gang in big cities and small towns around the world? Did you know it is an organization that recruits the desperate and twists them into hardened criminals capable of the most cruel crimes? Come and learn about this gang that is making headlines around the United States. We will be showing a documentary and a brief discussion will be held after. For more information, visit http://www.indiana.edu/~lacasa/.

Power and Visibility for Asian Pacific Americans: Why Public Policy and a United Voice Should Matter to APAs
April 4, 8 p.m., the IMU Faculty Club, Bloomington -- Kiran Ahuja, the executive director of the National Asian Pacific American Women's Forum in Washington, D.C., will discuss the critical policy issues that impact the Asian Pacific American (APA) community and APA women specifically. For more information, visit http://www.indiana.edu/~acc/.

"Privacy, Public Space and Non-Governmental Surveillance"
April 5, 3 p.m.-5:30 p.m., Kelley School of Business, room 736, Bloomington -- Who is watching us, and what are they doing with the data collected? To what extent are new technologies altering our conventional understandings of personal privacy and public life? Richard De George of University of Kansas will discuss a case study at 3 p.m., followed by a lecture at 4 p.m. and a response from Peter Finn, Professor in the IU Department of Psychological and Brain Sciences, with further discussion. For more information, visit http://poynter.indiana.edu/privacy.shtml.

"Presidential Power in the Age of Terror"
April 5, 4 p.m., Moot Court Room (123), 211 S. Indiana Ave., Bloomington -- IU's Center for Law, Society and Culture examines current debates about presidential power in the United States during its spring symposium. IU political science professor William Scheuetman will deliver the keynote address, "Presidentialism and Emergency Powers After 9/11." IU law professor Dawn Johnsen and IU history professor Nick Cullather will offer commentaries and conclude with an audience discussion. For more information, visit http://www.law.indiana.edu/.

A View of Central Indiana in 2040
April 5, 4:30 p.m., University Library Auditorium, 755 W. Michigan St., Indianapolis -- John Ottensmann, professor of public and environmental affairs and associate director of the Center for Urban Policy and the Environment, will speak on the increasing concerns of urban development and urban sprawl. This presentation will use the luci2 Urban Simulation Model, a geographic computer model that can forecast urban development scenarios for Central Indiana for 2040, illustrating the implications of alternative policy choices. For more information, call 317-278-2664.

Domenico Tiepolo

Domenico Tiepolo, "Jesus in the Garden of Gethsemane: the second prayer"

Domenico Tiepolo's New Testament
April 5, 7 p.m., School of Fine Arts, room 015, Bloomington -- Join IU Art Museum Director Heidi Gealt and Professor George Knox as they discuss their rediscovery of Domenico Tiepolo's New Testament cycle. For more information, visit http://artmuseum.iu.edu.

The Powers of Association Revisited: Moral Claims, Mobilization, and Worth in the Circuit Rider Technology Movement, 1995-2001
April 6, 2 p.m.-3:30 p.m., Wells Library, room LI011, Bloomington -- Paul-Brian McInerney, assistant professor of sociology and social informatics at Indiana University South Bend, will present drawing on three-years of ethnographic research and integrating concepts from science and technology studies, economic sociology and the study of collective behavior and social movements. McInerney will show how the circuit riders overcame structural challenges and mobilized a movement by drawing equivalences between information technology and organizational mission in the voluntary sector. For more information, visit http://rkcsi.indiana.edu/article.php/2007-spring/99.

"Modernity"
April 6, 4 p.m.-6 p.m., Ballantine Hall 003, Bloomington -- Roger Ariew, Department of Philosophy, University of Florida, will present the Department of History and Philosophy of Science's Westfall Lecture. Ariew will consider the question of how philosophical modernity may be resolved by determining what constitutes the break one wishes to depict between the work of Descartes and that of the scholastics, that is, how best to describe the reasons for the rise of modern philosophy and the waning of scholasticism. For more information, visit http://www.indiana.edu/~hpscdept/.

Eldridge Cleaver goes to Pyongyang, Hanoi, and Peking: Third World Internationalism and Radical Orientalism during the Vietnam Era
April 6, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Ballantine Hall 006, Bloomington -- Judy Wu, associate professor, Ohio State University, will explore the world of American antiwar activists who traveled internationally during the U.S. War in Vietnam, touching upon such issues as the multi-racial interactions. Wu will also emphasize how these international experiences shaped the identities and agendas of American political activists during the long decade of the 1960s. For more information, visit http://www.indiana.edu/~histweb/.

To find more lectures online, visit http://events.iu.edu.